June 27: Chuck Berry released “Anthology” in 2000

Chuck_Berry-The_Anthology-Frontal

Those seeking classic Berry all in one place now have countless choices, but these are the best: the flawlessly programmed The Great Twenty-Eight (or its slightly retooled update The Definitive Collection), the more in-depth and fully rounded Anthology (reissued in the exact same form as Gold, in 2005), or the hefty Chess Box, which offers the pleasure of side trips into Berry’s lesser-known work, much of it in a blues vein and some of it instrumental.
~Rollingstone.com

Wikipedia:

Released June 27, 2000
Recorded May 21, 1955 – December 22, 1969 in Chicago, Illinois
September 28, 1958 in St. Louis, Missouri
February 3, 1972 at the Lanchester Arts Festival, Coventry, England
1973 in New York
Genre Rock and roll
Label Chess
Producer Leonard Chess, Phil Chess, Esmond Edwards, Andy McKaie
Compiler Andy McKaie

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Classic Bootleg: Van Morrison Live in Montreux 1990 (Audio)

Essential, awesome, flawless. Quite possibly the best boot there is.
-Russell Parkinson

This is rated by Van Traders as one of the top Van bootlegs of all time. On some lists as high as number two. If you don’t have this it is essential Van the Man. The sound quality is very good soundboard/FM. There is an amazing version of “Sweet Thing” that seams nicely into “Astral Weeks” before returning back to “Sweet Thing” that makes this a special one. And “Northern Muse” changes to “Auld Lang Sine”, “No Prima Donna” and finishes with “When Heart is Open”. This is really some good stuff. The “Summertime in England” is awesome. At 13 minutes and Van adds “A Town Called Paradise”, “Take Me Back” and “Boogie Woogie Country Girl” into it. This truly is an amazing bootleg!
arizjones.blogspot.no

Casino de Montreux
Montreux, Switzerland
July 11, 1990

Featuring special guest Georgie Fame

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June 25: Happy 82nd Birthday Eddie Floyd

eddie-floyd

.. a workmanlike singer and a very accomplished songwriter, who showed occasional flashes of brilliance.
~The Rough Guide to Soul and R&B

“…I’d had nothing directly to do with Motown while I’d been in Detroit, I’d still been around a lotta their artists and seen from a distance how they did things. And so, when I eventually got to Memphis, I could see that it was pretty much the SAME – you know, musicians getting together producing music, with everybody in the same groove… So yeah, working at Stax was very easy, because everybody was open-minded. You know, Al and I first met (legendary MGs guitarist) Steve Cropper at the same time we met Jim Stewart. So what would happen is, Cropper and I would more or less go off to the hotel, sit down and talk about music – and BOOM, almost immediately we’d WRITE something! While Al Bell and Jim Stewart would go off and talk about music and BUSINESS… So yeah, that’s the way it started – and it just moved on from THERE! I later went on to write with Booker T., which was great too. You know, Stax was all about TEAM-work. Like if an artist was recording and needing backing singers, I’d go and sing on THEIR record, and in turn they’d sing on MINE! That’s just the way we DID things.”
– Eddie Floyd (Blues&Soul.com, issue 1067)

Raise Your Hand – Live in Oslo 1967:

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June 24: Happy 73rd Birthday Jeff Beck

I don’t care about the rules. In fact, if I don’t break the rules at least 10 times in every song then I’m not doing my job properly.
~Jeff Beck

Every time I listen to Jeff Beck my whole view of guitar changes radically. He’s way, way out, doing things you never expect.
~Brian May

Jimmy Page inducts Jeff Beck at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2009:

Jeff Beck accepts the award at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s Induction:

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Classic Live Album: Townes Van Zandt – Live at the Old Quarter, Houston, Texas

The set features 26 songs, all originals except for covers of “Cocaine Blues,” “Nine Pound Hammer,” and “Who Do You Love,” and Van Zandt brigs these tunes to life with an easy grace that’s a striking complement to the emotional gravity of his lyrics, though he also gives his lighter side an airing here, occasionally cracking jokes and offering a pair of funny talking blues numbers, “Talking Thunderbird Blues” and “Fraternity Blues.” If the renditions of “Pancho & Lefty,” “If I Needed You,” “Rex’s Blues,” “For the Sake of the Song,” and “Tecumseh Valley” aren’t quite definitive, they’re beautiful and affecting, and thanks to the sharp performances, on-point vocals, and superb set list, this is a superior document of Townes Van Zandt on-stage, and is a fine introduction to his body of work.
-Mark Deming (allmusic.com)

Amazon.com dates the CD release @ June 24, 2008, and that finally pushed me (Calendar OCD) to put out a post about this AWESOME album.

I love live music and most of the music I listen to is actually concert bootlegs (mostly Dylan, Van Morrison, Springsteen, The Stones, etc..), but there are some great officially released live albums out there as well.. and this is one of them. Recorded in July 1973, and released as a double live album in 1977.

We really love TVZ here @ borntolisten.com and when we made our “TWZ best songs” lists (a couple of years ago), the favourite versions on my list are mostly from this wonderful album (Kathleen, Lungs, If I Needed You, etc..).

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June 22: Sonny Rollins Released His Masterpiece “Saxophone Colossus” in 1956

Sonny Rollins recorded many memorable sessions during 1954-1958, but Saxophone Colossus is arguably his finest all-around set. Joined by pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Max Roach, Rollins debuts and performs the definitive version of “St. Thomas,” tears into the chord changes of “Mack the Knife” (here called “Moritat”), introduces “Strode Rode,” is lyrical on “You Don’t Know What Love Is,” and constructs a solo on “Blue Seven” that practically defines his style. Essential music that, as with all of Rollins’ Prestige recordings, has also been reissued as part of a huge “complete” box set; listeners with a tight budget are advised to pick up this single disc and be amazed.
-Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

St. Thomas:

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