Treasures from the archives: Bob Dylan and Earl Scruggs East Virginia Blues (Video 1971)

This song is by The Carter Family and appears on the compilations  The Carter Family Volume 1 – 1927-1934 (2002) and Longing for Old Virginia: Their Complete Victor Recordings (1934) (1998) . This will be included in Bpb Dylan’s Bootleg  Series Vol. 15 (along with 4 more Scruggs collaborations), but it is nice to be able to share some live video footage from this sit-down.




It’s a historical gem, Enjoy.

I was born in East Virginny
North Carolina I did go
There I spied a fair young lady
And her age I do not know

Her hair was dark in color
Her cheeks were rosy red
Upon her breast she wore white lilies
Where I longed to lay my head

Oh, at my heart you are my darlin’
At my door you’re welcome in
At my gate I’ll always meet you
For you’re the girl I’ve tried to win

I’d rather be in some dark holler
Where the sun refuse to shine
Than for you to be another man’s darlin’
And to know you’ll never be mine

– Hallgeir

Our favourite bootleg 1969: The Dylan / Cash sessions

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Our favourite bootleg from 1969:  The Dylan / Cash sessions

 

And now it will be officially released with a lot of extra tracks!

The latest chapter in the highly acclaimed Bob Dylan Bootleg Series revisits Dylan’s pivotal musical journeys to Nashville, from 1967 to 1969, focusing on previously unavailable recordings made with Johnny Cash and unreleased tracks from the John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline, and Self Portrait sessions.

Disc 1 finds Dylan in Columbia’s Studio A in Nashville recording alternate versions of compositions written for John Wesley Harding (October 17 and November 6, 1967) and Nashville Skyline (February 13-14, 1969) while introducing a new song “Western Road” (a Nashville Skyline outtake).

Discs 2 and 3 are centered around Dylan’s collaborations with American music icon Johnny Cash including the much sought-after Columbia Studio A sessions and on-stage performances at the Ryman Auditorium (May 1, 1969) for the recording of the premiere episode of The Johnny Cash Show (originally broadcast on ABC-TV on June 7, 1969).

Disc 3 closes with tracks recorded on May 17, 1970 with Grammy Award-winning bluegrass banjo legend Earl Scruggs for the PBS television special, “Earl Scruggs: His Family and Friends” (originally aired January 1971).

Wow!

[Bob Dylan]…the greatest writer of our times
– Johnny Cash (introducing “Wanted Man” on the album “At San Quentin”)

“I was deeply into folk music in the early 1960s, both the authentic songs from various periods and areas of American life and the new ‘folk revival’ songs of the time, so I took note of Bob Dylan as soon as the Bob Dylan album came out in early ’62 and listened almost constantly to The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan in ’63. I had a portable record player I’d take along on the road, and I’d put on Freewheelin’ backstage, then go out and do my show, then listen again as soon as I came off.”
– Johnny Cash (Cash, autobiography)

..Johnny was and is the North Star; you could guide your ship by him – the greatest of the greats then and now. I first met him in ‘62 or ‘63 and saw him a lot in those years. Not so much recently, but in some kind of way he was with me more than people I see every day.
– Bob Dylan (Statement on Johnny Cash – Sept 2003)

“Of course, I knew of him before he ever heard of me, In ’55 or ’56. ‘I Walk the Line’ played all summer on the radio, and it was different than anything else you had ever heard. The record sounded like a voice from the middle of the Earth. It was so powerful and moving.”
– Bob Dylan

They recorded together at the CBS studios, Nashville, TN   February 17-18, 1969, and it resulted in our favourite Bob Dylan (and Johnny Cash bootleg from 1969), The Dylan / Cash Sessions. It was released in 1994 and re-released in 2004.

dylan cash versjon 2
2004 re-release

 

The background story goes something like this:

Johnny Cash wrote the young Bob Dylan a letter, and they began writing back and forth. They met at the 1964 Newport Folk Festival and Cash gave Bob Dylan his guitar (This is a Country Music Tradition and is seen as a gesture of great respect and admiration).

When Bob Dylan was in Nashville recording his ninth studio album, Nashville Skyline, Johnny Cash was recording in the next door studio. Cash joined Dylan at the end of the sessions. On February 17 and 18, 1969, Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan laid down 15 tracks (that we know of). Only one, Girl From the North Country, was included on Nashville Skyline.

This is a bootleg of historic significance and a great recording. It is a document of two giants recording together, and even if it’s a bit loose and “hit and miss”, it is a joy to listen to. It’s a must have.

 

Other entries in this series:
My Favourite Bob Dylan bootleg from 1962: The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan Outtakes
My Favourite Bob Dylan bootleg from 2011: Funen Village, Odense, Denmark June 27
My Favourite Bob Dylan bootleg from 2012: The Day of Wine and Roses, Barolo, Italy July 16

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Classic Concert: Muddy Waters live in Molde, Norway 1977

Muddy Waters concert at the Molde Jazz Festival in 1977 did not start well, Willy Lee Smith was missing the cymbals and hi-hat for his drum set. The atmosphere was intense and the chaos on stage delayed the concert (a little bit). This was the opening concert at the Molde Jazz Festival in 1977, it was the 1st of August and the venue was the local cinema, Molde Kino.

Muddy Waters was tired after the European tour (this was the last concert on the tour). He said to the people in the crew that he’d rather sleep than play, but he was going to do two concerts in Molde this night.

Muddy Waters played two wonderful shows and the Norwegian Broadcasting Company (NRK) taped the first concert and they aired about an hour from the show on 29th of August 1977. The video we are presenting here is about 40 minutes long. Maybe NRK have more Muddy Waters in their vaults?

Muddy Waters soon gets into the groove and he delivered a classic concert in Molde in 1977. Enjoy!

1 Rocket (not on the video and without Muddy Waters)
2 Honey Dripper (not on the video and without Muddy Waters)
3 Evan’s Shuffle
4 Prison Bound Blues
5 Blow Wind Blow
6 (I’m Your) Hoochie Coochie Man
7 Baby Please Don’t Go
8 Can’t Get No Grindin’
9 You Don’t Have To Go (Muddy Waters leaves the stage)
10 Got My Mojo Working (encore)

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The Best Songs: Cold Cold Heart by Hank Williams

There was a time when I believed that you belonged to me
But now I know your heart is shackled to a memory
The more I learn to care for you, the more we drift apart
Why can’t I free your doubtful mind and melt your cold cold heart

“Cold, Cold Heart” is a country music and pop song recorded by Hank Williams. This blues ballad is both a classic of honky-tonk and an entry in the Great American Songbook. The first draft of the song is dated November 23, 1950, and was recorded with an unknown band on May 5, 1951.

This is dark stuff, filled with jealousy, bitterness and hopeless love.

Country music historian Colin Escott states that Williams was moved to write the song after visiting his wife Audrey in the hospital, who was suffering from an infection brought on by an abortion she had carried out at their home unbeknownst to Hank. Escott also speculates that Audrey, who carried on extramarital affairs as Hank did on the road, may have suspected the baby was not her husband’s. Florida bandleader Pappy Neil McCormick claims to have witnessed the encounter:

“According to McCormick, Hank went to the hospital and bent down to kiss Audrey, but she wouldn’t let him. ‘You sorry son of a bitch,’ she is supposed to have said, ‘it was you that caused me to suffer like this.’ Hank went home and told the children’s governess, Miss Ragland, that Audrey had a ‘cold, cold heart,’ and then, as so often in the past, realized the bitterness in his heart held commercial promise.”

“Another love before my time made your heart sad and blue, and so my heart is paying now for things I didn’t do.”

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Classic concert: Muddy Waters at Copenhagen Jazz festival in 1968 (video)

McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1913 – April 30, 1983), known professionally as Muddy Waters, was an American blues singer-songwriter and musician who is often cited as the “father of modern Chicago blues”.

This short and sweet set from Denmark, 27th October 1968 is a great showcase of his electric blues. It is a blistering concert with a great band, especially the great Otis Spann on piano. The sound and picture are both high broadcasting quality.
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July 14: American Folk Legend Woody Guthrie was born in 1912

“Take it easy, but take it.”
― Woody Guthrie

“The most important thing I know I learned from Woody Guthrie”
~Bob Dylan (The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan liner notes)

From Wikipedia:

Woodrow Wilson “Woody” Guthrie (July 14, 1912 – October 3, 1967) was an American singer-songwriter and folk musician whose musical legacy includes hundreds of political, traditional and children’s songs, ballads and improvised works. He frequently performed with the slogan This Machine Kills Fascists displayed on his guitar. His best-known song is “This Land Is Your Land.” Many of his recorded songs are archived in the Library of Congress. Such songwriters as Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Bruce Springsteen, John Mellencamp, Pete Seeger, Joe Strummer, Billy Bragg, Jeff Tweedy and Tom Paxton have acknowledged Guthrie as a major influence.

 

“…he paved the way for Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and a host of other folk and rock songwriters who have been moved by conscience to share experiences and voice opinions in a forthright manner.”
– Rock’n Roll Hall of Fame

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