March 23: Elvis Presley released his debut album “Elvis Presley” in 1956

This was as startling a debut record as any ever made, representing every side of Elvis’ musical influences except gospel — rockabilly, blues, R&B, country, and pop were all here in an explosive and seductive combination. Elvis Presley became the first rock & roll album to reach the number one spot on the national charts, and RCA’s first million dollar-earning pop album.
-Bruce Eder (allmusic.com)

Blues Sued Shoes:

Released March 23, 1956
Recorded July 1954 to January 1956
Genre
  • Rock and roll
  • rockabilly
  • rhythm and blues
  • country
Length 28:03
Label RCA Victor
Producer Sam Phillips (Sun recordings)
Steve Sholes (RCA recordings)

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March 22: The Beatles released Please Please Me in 1963

March 22: The Beatles released Please Please Me in 1963

….they were a group with the luck to meet opportunities, the wit to recognize them, the drive to seize them, and the talent to fullfil them. Please Please Me is the sound of them doing all four.
~Tom Ewing (pitchfork.com)

#1 – I Saw Her Standing There 

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March 10: Aretha Franklin released I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You in1967

(oo) What you want
(oo) Baby, I got
(oo) What you need
(oo) Do you know I got it?
(oo) All I’m askin’
(oo) Is for a little respect when you come home (just a little bit)
Hey baby (just a little bit) when you get home
(just a little bit) mister (just a little bit)

While the inclusion of “Respect” — one of the truly seminal singles in pop history — is in and of itself sufficient to earn I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You classic status, Aretha Franklin’s Atlantic label debut is an indisputable masterpiece from start to finish.
~Jason Ankeny (allmusic.com)

I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You (Amsterdam 1968):

Respect:

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March 3: Nick Cave – The Boatman’s Call (1997)

..It speak volumes about the album’s universality that its songs have soundtracked everything from Michael Hutchence’s funeral to Shrek 2.
~Stuart Berman (pitchfork.com)

The Boatman’s Call is one of his finest albums and arguably the masterpiece he has been promising throughout his career.
~Stephen Thomas Erlewine (allmusic.com)

Into My Arms – live

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Feb 14: The Who recorded “Live At Leeds” in 1970

Rolling Stone [Magazine] hailed it as the best ever live album, and they may still be right…
~Chris Jones (BBC – 2007)

The only clips from this fantastic concert: 

  • Fortune Teller (0:00 to 0:05) –
  • Happy Jack (0:06 to 0:13) –
  • I’m a Boy (0:14 to 0:33) –
  • A Quick One While He’s Away (0:34 to 2:09) –
  • Christmas (2:10 to 3:05) –
  • Pinball Wizard (3:06 to 3:22) –
  • Go to The Mirror (3:22 to 3:26) –
  • Smash The Mirror (3:27 to 3:35)-
  • Tommy’s Holliday Camp (3:36 to 3:45) –
  • We’re Not Gonna Take It (with See Me, Feel Me) (3:46 at the end)

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January 23: David Bowie released Station To Station in 1976

The return of the Thin White Duke
Throwing darts in lovers’ eyes
Here are we, one magical moment, such is the stuff

Station to Station is a collection of soul, rock, funk, and disco, twisted by an influence of experimental German artists. This is David Bowie’s “plastic soul” mixed with krautrock. This is the introduction of the “Thin White Duke”.

It is Bowie’s tenth album, one of his most important and in my opinion, one of his very best!

stationtostation2

David Bowie came from the soul infused “Young Americans” into Nicolas Roeg’s film, “The Man who fell to Earth” (the picture on the cover is a still from the film) and then into this masterpiece of a record. If you see the film and listen to Young Americans you get a sense of what made the album. There is a switch from popular dance oriented music into a more artful approach. But, without losing the pop sensibility. It is also a start for Bowie on his journey back to a more  European approach to his music, even if it was recorded in LA.

“I know it was in LA because I’ve read it was”
– David Bowie

TVC15 (from rehearsals for the Station to Station tour 1976):

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