May 14: Legendary producer the late Bob Johnston was born in 1932

Photo by Al Clayton

“Is it rolling, Bob?”
– Bob Dylan at the beginning of To Be Alone With You (Nashville Skyline)

“Johnston had fire in his eyes. He had that thing that some people call ‘Momentum.’ You could see it in his face and he shared that fire, that spirit. Columbia’s leading folk and country producer, he was born one hundred years too late. He should have been wearing a wide cape, a plumed hat, and riding with his sword held high. Johnston disregarded any warning that might get in his way. … Johnston lived on low country barbecue, and he was all charm.”
– Bob Dylan, Chronicles: Volume One

“I had the best in the world in my hand – there was no place I couldn’t go with him, so that’s where I went. I think Blonde On Blonde is the best record Dylan ever cut… Blonde On Blonde was the first symphony cut in Nashville!”
– Bob Johnston (Uncut magazine)

Donald William ‘Bob’ Johnston (born May 14, 1932, Hillsboro, Texas, died August 14, 2015) was an American record producer, best known for his work with Bob DylanJohnny CashLeonard Cohen, and Simon and Garfunkel.

Great interview from youtube (by Harper Simon):

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1971: 33 Songs released in 1971 you MUST hear

Rules:

  • Only one song per artist/group
  • The song must be released in 1971
  • Songs from live albums not allowed (that’s another & more complicated list)

Please feel free to publish your own favorite songs from 1971 in the comments section…

AND lists like this are supposed to be fun! Don’t take it too seriously.

My favorite (studio) albums from 1971 include:

Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. 2, If Only I Could Remember My Name (David Crosby),  There’s a Riot Goin’ On (Sly & the Family Stone), What’s Going On (Marvin Gaye), Who’s Next (The Who), Tapestry (Carole King),  Shaft: Music from the Soundtrack (Isaac Hayes),  Sticky Fingers (The Rolling Stones), Imagine (John Lennon),  Surf’s Up (Beach Boys),  LA Woman (The Doors),  Coat of Many Colors (Dolly Parton), IV (Led Zeppelin), Every Picture Tells a Story (Rod Stewart), Songs of Love & Hate (Leonard Cohen), Blue (Joni Mitchell), Pearl (Janis Joplin), White Light (Gene Clark), John Prine (John Prine), Nilsson Schmilsson (Harry Nilsson), Hunky Dory (David Bowie), Tupelo Honey (Van Morrison), Jack Johnson (Miles Davis), The Cry of Love (Jimi Hendrix), In Search Of A Song (Tom T. Hall), Crazy Horse (Crazy Horse) & Just as I Am (Bill Withers).

Here we go…

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Best Albums 2016 – Lists from Rolling Stone & Paste Magazine

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More Year-end lists, this time from two american magazines: Rolling Stone mag & Paste. Relevant videos are bundled inbetween.

Rolling Stone’s Top 50 Albums of 2016

Check out the post @ Rolling Stone site

Beyoncé – Hold Up:

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Best Albums 2016 – Lists from Uncut & MOJO

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It´s that time of year, the Year-end lists are rolling in.

This post includes 2 UK based magazines: UNCUT & MOJO. My favourite magazine among them is UNCUT Magazine. So I´ll start there.. and also throw some videos in between.

Uncut’s Top 75 Albums of 2016

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David Bowie – Lazarus:

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Leonard Cohen – Best Songs poll

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Like a bird on the wire,
Like a drunk in a midnight choir
I have tried in my way to be free.

So let´s hear it, what´s your favourite Leonard Cohen Songs ?

Please tell us your top 5/10/15/20 Leonard Cohen songs list. Use the comment function in this post, or head over to Facebook @ alldylan.com @ facebook and comment in my post.

Here is my top 25:

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Leonard Cohen: 1970 Isle of Wight Festival (full concert video)

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Tension had been rising at the festival for days. The promoters had expected a hundred and fifty thousand people but half a million more turned up, many with no intention of paying. Even after the promoters were forced to declare it a free festival, ill will remained. During a set by Kris Kristofferson, bottles were thrown and he was booed offstage. “They were booing everybody,” says Kristofferson. “Except Leonard Cohen.”
~Sylvie Simmons

First off some facts from wikipedia:

The 1970 Isle of Wight Festival was held between 26 and 31 August 1970 at East Afton Farm an area on the western side of the Isle of Wight. It was the last of three consecutive music festivals to take place on the island between 1968 and 1970 and widely acknowledged as the largest musical event of its time, greater than the attendance of Woodstock. Although estimates vary, the Guinness Book of Records estimated 600,000, possibly 700,000 people attended. It was organised and promoted by local brothers, Ronnie, Ray and Bill Foulk. Ron Smith was site manager and Rikki Farr acted as compere.

The preceding Isle of Wight Festivals, also promoted by the Foulks, had already gained a good reputation in 1968 and 1969 by featuring acts such as Jefferson Airplane, T. Rex, The Move, The Pretty Things, Joe Cocker, The Moody Blues (performed at the 1969 festival), The Who, and Bob Dylan in his first performance since his 1966 motorcycle accident.

The 1970 version, following Woodstock in the previous year, set out to move one step forward and enlisted Jimi Hendrix. With Hendrix confirmed, artists such as Chicago, The Doors, Lighthouse, The Moody Blues, The Who, Miles Davis, Joan Baez, Joni Mitchell, Jethro Tull, Sly & the Family Stone, Ten Years After, Emerson, Lake & Palmer and Free willingly took up the chance to play there. The event had a magnificent but impractical site, since the prevailing wind blew the sound sideways across the venue, and the sound system had to be augmented by Pink Floyd’s PA. There was a strong, but inconsistent line up, and the logistical nightmare of transporting some 600,000 people onto an island with a population of fewer than 100,000.

Political and logistical difficulties resulted in the organisers eventually realising that the festival would not make a profit and declaring it to be “a free festival”, although the majority of the audience had paid for tickets in advance, and the event was filmed contemporaneously. The commercial failings of the festival ensured it was the last event of its kind on the Isle of Wight for thirty-two years.

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