March 21: The Late Son House was born in 1902

Photo by Giuseppe Pino


“Of course that was my idol, Son House. I think he did a lot for the Mississippi slide down there.”
~Muddy Waters

“People keep asking me where the blues started and all I can say is that when I was a boy we always was singing in the fields. Not real singing, you know, just hollerin’, but we made up our songs about things that was happening to us at the time, and I think that’s where the blues started.”
~Son House (1965)

Death Letter Blues:

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March 20: Sinéad O’Connor released I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got in 1990

“I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got became Sinéad O’Connor’s popular breakthrough on the strength of the stunning Prince cover “Nothing Compares 2 U,” which topped the pop charts for a month. But even its remarkable intimacy wasn’t adequate preparation for the harrowing confessionals that composed the majority of the album.”
– Steve Huey (allmusic)

I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got is the second album by Sinéad O’Connor, released 20th of March in 1990 on Ensign/Chrysalis Records. It contains O’Connor’s version of the Prince song “Nothing Compares 2 U”, which was released as a single and reached number one in multiple countries. The album was nominated for four Grammy Awards in 1991, including Record of the Year, Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, and Best Music Video, Short Form for “Nothing Compares 2 U” Continue reading “March 20: Sinéad O’Connor released I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got in 1990”

March 18: Iggy Pop released The Idiot in 1977

The Idiot is the debut solo album by Iggy Pop. It was the first of two LPs released in 1977 which Pop wrote and recorded in collaboration with David Bowie. Although issued after Low, the opening installment of Bowie’s so-called Berlin Trilogy, the pair began writing and recording songs for The Idiot in mid-1976, before Bowie started work on his own album. As such, The Idiot has been claimed as heralding the unofficial beginning of Bowie’s ‘Berlin’ period, being compared particularly to Low and “Heroes” in its electronic effects, treated instrument sounds, and introspective atmosphere. A departure from the hard rock of his former band the Stooges, the album is regarded by critics as one of Pop’s best works. Its title was inspired by Dostoyevsky’s novel The Idiot, three of the participants in the recording—Bowie, Pop and Tony Visconti—being familiar with the book. I will argue that there’s really a “Berlin-quintet” consisting of: The Idiot, Low, “Heroes”, Lust for life and Lodger.

Iggy Pop’s The Idiot, is equally a David Bowie album as a guest singer/composer; Davis Bowie co-wrote all the songs (except Sister Midnight that was co-written with Carlos Alomar and David Bowie) , played many of the instruments and produced it (kind of…). Tony Visconti tried to salvage the over-modulated tapes at the mixing stage.

Released March 18, 1977
Recorded July 1976 – February 1977,Château d’Hérouville, Hérouville, France, Musicland Studios, Munich, Hansa by the Wall, Berlin
Genre Post-punk, art rock
Length 38:49
Label RCA
Producer David Bowie (and Tony Visconti)


“Poor Jim, in a way, became a guinea pig for what I wanted to do with sound. I didn’t have the material at the time, and I didn’t feel like writing at all. I felt much more like laying back and getting behind someone else’s work, so that album was opportune, creatively”
– David Bowie

So, Iggy Pop acted as a guinea pig. David Bowie seemed tired of his ever-changing narrative or masks, so he used the opportunity making an Iggy solo record as a way to start re-inventing himself as well as Iggy. Iggy Pop and David Bowie worked extremely well as a team.


March 16: Hank Williams recorded “Hey, Good Lookin'” in 1951

hank williams hey good lookin

Recording session:

Date: March 16, 1951 (1:30 – 5:00 pm)
Location: Castle Studio, Nashville, TN
Label: MGM

  • Hank Williams (vocal, guitar)
  • Jerry Rivers (fiddle)
  • Don Helms (steel guitar)
  • Sammy Pruett (electric guitar)
  • Jack Shook (rhythm guitar)
  • Ernie Newton or “Cedric Rainwater” (Howard Watts) (bass)
  • Owen Bradley or Fred Rose (pn)


  1. I CAN’T HELP IT (IF I’M STILL IN LOVE WITH YOU) – 2:22 (Hank Williams)
  2. HOWLIN’ AT THE MOON – 2:41 (Hank Williams)
  3. HEY, GOOD LOOKIN’ – 2:53 (Hank Williams)
  4. MY HEART WOULD KNOW – 2:24 (Hank Williams)

4 great songs, but my fav is Hey, Good Lookin’.

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March 15: The Legend Lightnin Hopkins was born in 1912

Sam John Hopkins (March 15, 1912 – January 30, 1982), better known as Lightnin’ Hopkins, was an American country blues singer, songwriter, guitarist and occasional pianist, fromHouston, Texas. Rolling Stone magazine included Hopkins at number 71 on their list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

Musicologist Robert “Mack” McCormick opined that Hopkins “is the embodiment of the jazz-and-poetry spirit, representing its ancient form in the single creator whose words and music are one act”

I came to Lightnin’ Hopkins through Townes Van Zandt and Justin Townes Earle (I guess he discovered him through Townes as well…). I was expecting something ancient, something old, but Hopkins sounds modern and his guitar playing is just out of this world!

Sometimes music hit you so hard you simply do not know what happened, Justin Townes Earle did just that when he covered the relatively unknown song, hell, he  ripped through a rousing version of Lightnin’ Hopkins’ My starter won’t start (I been burnin bad gasoline). And suddenly I understood what/why Hopkins was held in as high a regard as he does! It was pure magic! (see own post)

Lightnin’ Hopkins – Baby Please Don’t go:

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March 11: Déjà Vu by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young was released in 1970

crosby stills nash young deja vu

March 11: Déjà Vu (Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young album) released in 1970


One of the most hotly awaited second albums in history — right up there with those by the Beatles and the Band — Déjà Vu lived up to its expectations and rose to number one on the charts.
~Bruce Eder (

Almost Cut My Hair – Live Wembley 1974:

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