March 22: The Beatles released Please Please Me in 1963

March 22: The Beatles released Please Please Me in 1963

….they were a group with the luck to meet opportunities, the wit to recognize them, the drive to seize them, and the talent to fullfil them. Please Please Me is the sound of them doing all four.
~Tom Ewing (pitchfork.com)

#1 – I Saw Her Standing There 

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March 21: The Late Son House was born in 1902

“Of course that was my idol, Son House. I think he did a lot for the Mississippi slide down there.”
~Muddy Waters

“People keep asking me where the blues started and all I can say is that when I was a boy we always was singing in the fields. Not real singing, you know, just hollerin’, but we made up our songs about things that was happening to us at the time, and I think that’s where the blues started.”
~Son House (1965)

Death Letter Blues:

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Chuck Berry: 11 often overlooked but great songs – Rest in peace

The legend, guitarist Chuck Berry, who merged blues, country, gospel, jazz and swing into the phenomenon of rock’n’roll, died on Saturday aged 90, according to Missouri police. We’re not putting together a greatest song list (maybe later…) but we will try to honour the master by finding 11 songs that are too often overlooked.

What is a “buried treasure”, “a hidden gem” or “an underrated gem” ? Well, to me, it’s a great song that seldom (or never) is on the “best-of” lists of the artist, and it could have/should have been.

I am talking about great songs that are often overlooked. We are talking about personal favourites that you wouldn’t rate among the artists top 20 (maybe), but deserve some more praise and recognition than they get.

Rest in peace great artist!

– Hallgeir

March 18: Miles Davis released “Round About Midnight” in 1957

 

There’s little else to say except that ‘Round About Midnight is among the most essential of Davis’ Columbia recordings.
~Thom Jurek (allmusic.com)

An absolute classic of modern jazz, with brilliant solo work from the leader and from Coltrane, who was preparing for his own solo career at this point, plus subtle backing from the rhythm section. Tunes range from Monk’s famous title track to the ancient standard “Bye Bye Blackbird.”
~Wilson & Alroy’s Record Reviews

Stylistically, Midnight encompasses standards (or soon-to-be standards) such as “Dear Old Stockholm”, “Bye-Bye Blackbird”, Tadd Dameron’s “Tadd’s Delight”, and Jackie McLean’s forward-thinking composition “Little Melonae.” Miles and company reprise “Budo” from the historic Birth of the Cool sessions. The standout track is Davis’s Harmon-muted reading of Thelonious Monk’s ballad, “‘Round Midnight”, which is still a Miles standard bearer… If you want to hear the origins of post-bop modern jazz, this is it.
~Eugene Holley, Jr.

‘Round Midnight:

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March 18: Iggy Pop released The Idiot in 1977

The Idiot is the debut solo album by Iggy Pop. It was the first of two LPs released in 1977 which Pop wrote and recorded in collaboration with David Bowie. Although issued after Low, the opening installment of Bowie’s so-called Berlin Trilogy, the pair began writing and recording songs for The Idiot in mid-1976, before Bowie started work on his own album. As such, The Idiot has been claimed as heralding the unofficial beginning of Bowie’s ‘Berlin’ period, being compared particularly to Low and “Heroes” in its electronic effects, treated instrument sounds, and introspective atmosphere. A departure from the hard rock of his former band the Stooges, the album is regarded by critics as one of Pop’s best works. Its title was inspired by Dostoyevsky’s novel The Idiot, three of the participants in the recording—Bowie, Pop and Tony Visconti—being familiar with the book. I will argue that there’s really a “Berlin-quintet” consisting of: The Idiot, Low, “Heroes”, Lust for life and Lodger.

Iggy Pop’s The Idiot, is equally a David Bowie album as a guest singer/composer; Davis Bowie co-wrote all the songs (except Sister Midnight that was co-written with Carlos Alomar and David Bowie) , played many of the instruments and produced it (kind of…). Tony Visconti tried to salvage the over-modulated tapes at the mixing stage.

Released March 18, 1977
Recorded July 1976 – February 1977,Château d’Hérouville, Hérouville, France, Musicland Studios, Munich, Hansa by the Wall, Berlin
Genre Post-punk, art rock
Length 38:49
Label RCA
Producer David Bowie (and Tony Visconti)

Funtime:

“Poor Jim, in a way, became a guinea pig for what I wanted to do with sound. I didn’t have the material at the time, and I didn’t feel like writing at all. I felt much more like laying back and getting behind someone else’s work, so that album was opportune, creatively”
– David Bowie

So, Iggy Pop acted as a guinea pig. David Bowie seemed tired of his ever-changing narrative or masks, so he used the opportunity making an Iggy solo record as a way to start re-inventing himself as well as Iggy. Iggy Pop and David Bowie worked extremely well as a team.

Personell:

March 16: Hank Williams recorded “Hey, Good Lookin'” in 1951

hank williams hey good lookin

Recording session:

Date: March 16, 1951 (1:30 – 5:00 pm)
Location: Castle Studio, Nashville, TN
Label: MGM

  • Hank Williams (vocal, guitar)
  • Jerry Rivers (fiddle)
  • Don Helms (steel guitar)
  • Sammy Pruett (electric guitar)
  • Jack Shook (rhythm guitar)
  • Ernie Newton or “Cedric Rainwater” (Howard Watts) (bass)
  • Owen Bradley or Fred Rose (pn)

Session:

  1. I CAN’T HELP IT (IF I’M STILL IN LOVE WITH YOU) – 2:22 (Hank Williams)
  2. HOWLIN’ AT THE MOON – 2:41 (Hank Williams)
  3. HEY, GOOD LOOKIN’ – 2:53 (Hank Williams)
  4. MY HEART WOULD KNOW – 2:24 (Hank Williams)

4 great songs, but my fav is Hey, Good Lookin’.

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