April 8: Elvis Presley released Elvis is Back! in 1960

Elvis is back

 Recorded when Presley was 25, fresh off a two-year military stint and musically fit to burst, Elvis Is Back! might be the King’s greatest noncompilation LP: wildly varied material, revelatory singing, impeccable stereo sound.
~Will Hermes (rollingstone.com)

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April 1: The White Stripes released “Elephant” in 2003

“..a work of pulverizing perfection,.. It will be one of the best things you hear all year”
-David Fricke (rollingstone.com)

“Crucially, the White Stripes know the difference between fame and success; while they may not be entirely comfortable with their fame, they’ve succeeded at mixing blues, punk, and garage rock in an electrifying and unique way ever since they were strictly a Detroit phenomenon. On these terms, Elephant is a phenomenal success.”
-Heather Phares (allmusic.com)

Released April 1, 2003
Recorded November 2001 and April 2002 at Toe Rag Studios and BBC Maida Vale Studios, London, England
Genre

Alternative rock, garage rock, blues rock & punk blues

Length 49:56
Label V2, XL
Producer Jack White

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March 28: Led Zeppelin Houses of the Holy was released in 1973

“The Rain Song” is one of Zep’s finest moments, featuring a soaring string arrangement and a gentle, aching melody. “The Ocean” is just as good, starting with a heavy, funky guitar groove before slamming into an a cappella section and ending with a swinging, doo wop-flavored rave-up. With the exception of the rampaging opening number, “The Song Remains the Same,” the rest of Houses of the Holy is fairly straightforward, ranging from the foreboding “No Quarter” and the strutting hard rock of “Dancing Days” to the epic folk/metal fusion “Over the Hills and Far Away.” Throughout the record, the band’s playing is excellent, making the eclecticism of Page and Robert Plant’s songwriting sound coherent and natural.”
– Thomas Erlewine (allmusic)

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March 11: Déjà Vu by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young was released in 1970

crosby stills nash young deja vu

March 11: Déjà Vu (Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young album) released in 1970

 

One of the most hotly awaited second albums in history — right up there with those by the Beatles and the Band — Déjà Vu lived up to its expectations and rose to number one on the charts.
~Bruce Eder (allmusic.com)

Almost Cut My Hair – Live Wembley 1974:

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March 3: Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds released The Boatman’s Call in 1997

..It speak volumes about the album’s universality that its songs have soundtracked everything from Michael Hutchence’s funeral to Shrek 2.
~Stuart Berman (pitchfork.com)

The Boatman’s Call is one of his finest albums and arguably the masterpiece he has been promising throughout his career.
~Stephen Thomas Erlewine (allmusic.com)

Into My Arms – live

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February 13: The Black Crowes released Shake Your Money Maker in 1990

“Shake Your Money Maker may not be stunningly original, but it doesn’t need to be; it’s the most concise demonstration of the fact that the Black Crowes are a great, classic rock & roll band.”
– Steve Huey (allmusic)

Shake Your Money Maker is the debut studio album by The Black Crowes, released 13th of February 1990 on Def American Recordings. It is the only album by the band to feature guitarist Jeff Cease. The album is named after a classic blues song written by Elmore James. The Black Crowes have played the song live many times over the years, but it is not included on this album.

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