10 Great Willie Nelson songs (videos & spotify playlist)

Tomorrow is Willie Nelson´s 85th birthday (born April 29, 1933).

He [Willie Nelson] takes whatever thing he’s singing and makes it his. There’s not many people who can do that. Even something like an Elvis tune. You know, once Elvis done a tune, it’s pretty much done. But Willie is the only one in my recollection that has even taken something associated with Elvis and made it his. He just puts his sorta trip on it…
~Bob Dylan (28 April 1993)

Here are 10 wonderful songs performed & most of them written by Mr. Nelson.

 Always on My Mind

An American country music song by Johnny Christopher, Mark James and Wayne Carson, recorded first by Gwen McCrae (as “You Were Always On My Mind”) and Brenda Lee in 1972.

Willie Nelson recorded and released the song in early 1982. It raced to number one on Billboard magazine’s Hot Country Singles chart that May, spending two weeks on top and total of 21 weeks on the chart.

Maybe I didn’t treat you
Quite as good as I should have
Maybe I didn’t love you
Quite as often as I could have
Little things I should have said and done
I just never took the time

You were always on my mind
You were always on my mind

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March 26: The Rolling Stones at The Marquee Club London 1971





Wonderful concert with a Mick Taylor in superb form…

Live debut of album tracks, “Brown Sugar”, “Dead Flowers”, “Bitch” and “I Got The Blues” (all from “Sticky Fingers”, released a month later)

Band:

  • Mick Jagger – Vocals
  • Keith Richards – Guitar
  • Mick Taylor – Guitar
  • Bill Wyman – Bass
  • Charlie Watts – Drums
  • Ian Stewart – Piano
  • Nicky Hopkins – Keyboards
  • Bobby Keys – Sax
  • Jim Price – Horns

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March 24: Happy Birthday Nick Lowe

The world is full of musicians who can play great, and you wouldn’t cross the road to see them. It’s people who have this indefinable attitude that are the good ones.
~Nick Lowe

As long as my body holds out, I’ll be grooving when I’m 70, and not some sort of horrible spectacle.
~Nick Lowe

As the leader of the seminal pub rockers Brinsley Schwarz, a producer, and a solo artist, Nick Lowe held considerable influence over the development of punk rock. With the Brinsleys, Lowe began a back-to-basics movement that flowered into punk rock in the late ’70s. As the house producer for Stiff, he recorded many seminal records by the likes of the Damned, Elvis Costello, and the Pretenders. His rough, ragged production style earned him the nickname “Basher” and also established the amateurish, D.I.Y. aesthetics of punk. Despite his massive influence on punk rock, Lowe was never really a punk rocker. ..
~Stephen Thomas Erlewine (allmusic.com)

Live BBC 4 Sessions 2007 concert (59min)

00:19 Heart
03:45 What’s Skakin’ On The Hill
07:16 Without Love
09:55 Lately I’ve Let Things Slide
13:16 Has She Got A Friend?
16:05 I Trained Her To Love Me
20:23 Indian Queens
24:21 Cruel To Be Kind
27:47 You Inspire Me
31:15 Introducing The Horns
31:52 Long Limbed Girl
34:55 Hope For Us All
38:56 The Other Side Of The Coin
42:15 Shting-Shtang
45:08 The Man In Love
47:22 (What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding
51:40 I Knew The Bride
56:00 The Beast In Me

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Dec 2: Michael Jackson released the video, Thriller, in 1983

Michael Jackson’s Thriller is an American 13-minute music video for the song of the same name released on December 2, 1983. It was directed by the great John Landis, who also co-wrote the screenplay with Michael Jackson. The song was released from his sixth studio album of the same name. This music video aired alongside the Inspector Gadget episode, “Tree Guesses”.

It was MTV’s first world premiere video. Voted as the most influential pop music video of all time, in the UK Channel 4 aired the video late at night Thriller proved to have a profound effect on popular culture, and was named “a watershed moment for the [music] industry” for its unprecedented merging of filmmaking and music. Guinness World Records listed it in 2006 as the “most successful music video”, selling over nine million copies.

In 2009, the video was inducted into the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress, the first music video to ever receive this honor, for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant. The track was also listed at number one on “The Top 10 Halloween Songs” by Billboard.

Michael Jackson’s Thriller (13 min. version):

The video (like the song) contains a spoken word performance by horror film veteran Vincent Price. Rick Baker assisted in prosthetics and makeup for the production.

– Hallgeir

Sep 15: Watch – Van Morrison & The Chieftains at Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland 1988

van morrison belfast 1988

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_message message_box_color=”mulled_wine” icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-quote-left”]The band kick into spirited versions of “Tore down A la Rimbaud”, “In The Garden” and “Rave On, John Donne”, before being joined by the might of the Chieftains for a full set. WONDERFUL is the only word.
– Brian Hinton (Celtic Crossroads)[/vc_message][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Van Morrison with The Chieftains
Ulster Hall, Belfast
September 15, 1988

  • Artie McGlynn – Guitar
  • Dave Early – Drums
  • Clive Culbertson – Bass
  • Richie Buckley – Saxophone
  • Derek Bell – Keyboards
  • June Boyce – Backing Vocal
  • The Chieftains – Band

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September 10: Randy Newman Released Good Old Boys in 1974

Randy_Newman-Good_Old_Boys-Frontal

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_message message_box_color=”mulled_wine” icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-quote-left”]“To me, someone who writes really good songs is Randy Newman. There’s a lot of people who write good songs. As songs. Now Randy might not go out on stage and knock you out, or knock your socks off. And he’s not going to get people thrilled in the front row. He ain’t gonna do that. But he’s gonna write a better song than most people who can do it.

You know, he’s got that down to an art. Now Randy knows music. He knows music But it doesn’t get any better than “Louisiana” or “Cross Charleston Bay” [“Sail Away”]. It doesn’t get any better than that. It’s like a classically heroic anthem theme. He did it. There’s quite a few people who did it. Not that many people in Randy’s class.”
– Bob Dylan (1991)[/vc_message][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Good Old Boys is the fifth album by Randy Newman, released 10 September 1974 on Reprise Records. It peaked at #36 on the Billboard 200, Newman’s first album to obtain major commercial success. The premiere live performance of the album took place on October 5, 1974, at the Symphony Hall in Atlanta, Georgia, with guest Ry Cooder and Newman conducting the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

This is one of the best records about “The South” that has ever been made. Randy Newman is cruel but, oh, so witty.

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_message message_box_color=”mulled_wine” icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-quote-left”]The album’s scabrous opening cut, “Rednecks,” is guaranteed to offend practically anyone with its tale of a slow-witted, willfully (and proudly) ignorant Southerner obsessed with “keeping the n—–s down.” “A Wedding in Cherokee County” is more polite but hardly less mean-spirited, in which an impotent hick marries a circus freak; if the song’s melody and arrangement weren’t so skillful, it would be hard to imagine anyone bothering with this musical geek show.

Good Old Boys is one of Newman’s finest albums; it’s also one of his most provocative and infuriating, and that’s probably just the way he wanted it.
Mark Demming (Allmusic.com)[/vc_message][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Rednecks:

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