Dec 2: Michael Jackson released the video, Thriller, in 1983

Michael Jackson’s Thriller is an American 13-minute music video for the song of the same name released on December 2, 1983. It was directed by the great John Landis, who also co-wrote the screenplay with Michael Jackson. The song was released from his sixth studio album of the same name. This music video aired alongside the Inspector Gadget episode, “Tree Guesses”.

It was MTV’s first world premiere video. Voted as the most influential pop music video of all time, in the UK Channel 4 aired the video late at night Thriller proved to have a profound effect on popular culture, and was named “a watershed moment for the [music] industry” for its unprecedented merging of filmmaking and music. Guinness World Records listed it in 2006 as the “most successful music video”, selling over nine million copies.

In 2009, the video was inducted into the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress, the first music video to ever receive this honor, for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant. The track was also listed at number one on “The Top 10 Halloween Songs” by Billboard.

Michael Jackson’s Thriller (13 min. version):

The video (like the song) contains a spoken word performance by horror film veteran Vincent Price. Rick Baker assisted in prosthetics and makeup for the production.

– Hallgeir

Sep 15: Watch – Van Morrison & The Chieftains at Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland 1988

van morrison belfast 1988

The band kick into spirited versions of “Tore down A la Rimbaud”, “In The Garden” and “Rave On, John Donne”, before being joined by the might of the Chieftains for a full set. WONDERFUL is the only word.
– Brian Hinton (Celtic Crossroads)

Van Morrison with The Chieftains
Ulster Hall, Belfast
September 15, 1988

  • Artie McGlynn – Guitar
  • Dave Early – Drums
  • Clive Culbertson – Bass
  • Richie Buckley – Saxophone
  • Derek Bell – Keyboards
  • June Boyce – Backing Vocal
  • The Chieftains – Band

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September 10: Randy Newman Released Good Old Boys in 1974

Randy_Newman-Good_Old_Boys-Frontal

“To me, someone who writes really good songs is Randy Newman. There’s a lot of people who write good songs. As songs. Now Randy might not go out on stage and knock you out, or knock your socks off. And he’s not going to get people thrilled in the front row. He ain’t gonna do that. But he’s gonna write a better song than most people who can do it.

You know, he’s got that down to an art. Now Randy knows music. He knows music But it doesn’t get any better than “Louisiana” or “Cross Charleston Bay” [“Sail Away”]. It doesn’t get any better than that. It’s like a classically heroic anthem theme. He did it. There’s quite a few people who did it. Not that many people in Randy’s class.”
– Bob Dylan (1991)

Good Old Boys is the fifth album by Randy Newman, released 10 September 1974 on Reprise Records. It peaked at #36 on the Billboard 200, Newman’s first album to obtain major commercial success. The premiere live performance of the album took place on October 5, 1974, at the Symphony Hall in Atlanta, Georgia, with guest Ry Cooder and Newman conducting the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

This is one of the best records about “The South” that has ever been made. Randy Newman is cruel but, oh, so witty.

The album’s scabrous opening cut, “Rednecks,” is guaranteed to offend practically anyone with its tale of a slow-witted, willfully (and proudly) ignorant Southerner obsessed with “keeping the n—–s down.” “A Wedding in Cherokee County” is more polite but hardly less mean-spirited, in which an impotent hick marries a circus freak; if the song’s melody and arrangement weren’t so skillful, it would be hard to imagine anyone bothering with this musical geek show.

Good Old Boys is one of Newman’s finest albums; it’s also one of his most provocative and infuriating, and that’s probably just the way he wanted it.
Mark Demming (Allmusic.com)

Rednecks:

Continue reading “September 10: Randy Newman Released Good Old Boys in 1974”

1961: 20 Songs Released in 1961 You Must Hear

My rules:

  • Only one song per artist/group
  • The song must be released that specific year
  • Songs from live albums not allowed (that’s another & more complicated list)

Please feel free to publish your own favorite songs from 1961 in the comments section…

Here we go…

1965: 20 Songs Released in 1965 You Must Hear






The Year 1965 summary

  • The first US combat troops arrive in Vietnam. By the end of the year, 190,000 American soldiers are in Vietnam.
  • Rhodesia unilaterally declares its independence from Britain
  • Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and more than 2,600 others arrested in Selma, Ala., during demonstrations against voter-registration rules
  • Malcolm X, black-nationalist leader, shot to death at Harlem rally
  • Blacks riot for six days in Watts section of Los Angeles: 34 dead, over 1,000 injured, nearly 4,000 arrested
  • Movies: Dr. Zhivago, The Sound of Music
    Deaths: Winston Churchill, Nat King Cole & T.S. Eliot

My rules:

  • Only one song per artist/group
  • The song must be released that specific year
  • Songs from live albums not allowed
  • Restricted to only 20 songs

20 songs you must hear from 1965

Continue reading “1965: 20 Songs Released in 1965 You Must Hear”

August 24: Drive-By Truckers released The Dirty South in 2004

the-dirty-south

You can throw me in the Colbert County jailhouse.
You can throw me off the Wilson Dam
but there ain’t much difference in the man I wanna be and the man I really am.

We ain’t never gonna change.

The Dirty South is the fifth album by Alabamian alternative country/Southern rock group Drive-By Truckers, released in 2004. The Dirty South is Drive-By Truckers’ third concept album. Like its two predecessors, the album examines the state of the South, and unveils the hypocrisy, irony, and tragedy that continues to exist.

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