December 13: The great Tom Verlaine was born in 1949

photo: Hallgeir Olsen/BornToListen

Tom Verlaine

Tom Verlaine (born Thomas Miller, December 13, 1949):
Singer, songwriter and guitarist, best known as the frontman for the New York rock band Television.

Tom Verlaine
Birth name Thomas Miller
Born 13 December 1949 (age 69)
Morristown, New Jersey, United States
Genres Punk rock, art punk, post-punk, new wave
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, musician
Instruments Guitar, vocals, piano
Associated acts Television, Neon Boys
Notable instruments
Fender Jazzmaster
Fender Jaguar
Fender Stratocaster
Danelectro Shorthorn Deluxe

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December 5: Little Richard was born in 1932

 When you sit down and think about what rock ‘n’ roll music really is, then you have to change that question. Played up-tempo, you call it rock ‘n’ roll; at a regular tempo, you call it rhythm and blues.
~Little RichardLittle Richard Interview with Bill Boggs:

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December 4: The Beatles released Beatles For Sale in 1964

Beatles for Sale is the fourth studio album by the Beatles, it was released on 4 December 1964 and produced by George Martin. The album marked a minor turning point in the evolution of the Lennon -McCartney  partnership, John Lennon particularly now showing interest in composing songs of a more autobiographical nature. I’m a Loser shows Lennon for the first time coming under the influence of Bob Dylan, whom he met in New York while on tour, on 28 August 1964.

John, when you were in New York, what did you like best about it?

 I just like cities, you see, and preferably big ones. That’s why I liked it. And we met some good people like Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, you know, and I enjoy meeting people I admire.

(Sept 13, 1964 via In The Life Of…The Beatles)

Beatles for Sale didn’t  produce a single for the UK – the non-album tracks I Feel Fine and She’s a Woman performed that role. Nevertheless, that coupling was followed up in the United States by Eight Days a Week, which became their seventh number one.

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December 3: The Beatles Rubber Soul was released in 1965

There are places I’ll remember
All my life, though some have changed
Some forever, not for better
Some have gone and some remain
All these places had their moments
With lovers and friends, I still can recall
Some are dead and some are living
In my life, I’ve loved them all

All four faces of The Beatles appear stretched on the cover of 1965’s Rubber Soul, but it is not only the picture that is mind bending, the music within stretches the boundaries of popular music, too. In my mind it is he first truly unified album by The Beatles (and their first recorded within a specified session period), it is a quantum leap compared to the band’s past work. The Songwriting is out of this world, and the instrumentation was cutting edge. A milestone in rock history.
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November 30: Roger Glover was born in 1945

Photo: Carlos Delgado

Happy birthday!

Roger David Glover (born 30 November 1945) bassist, songwriter, and record producer. He is best known as the bassist for hard rock band Deep Purple. Glover wrote the guitar riff on “Maybe I’m a Leo”. As a member of Deep Purple, Glover was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April 2016.


Glover spent four years (1969–1973) with Deep Purple, during which the band saw their most successful releases in the albums in Rock, Machine Head, Who Do We Think We Are and the live album Made in Japan. He is credited with developing the title for the band’s iconic “Smoke on the Water” song, thus inspiring the song’s lyrics which were written by Ian Gillan. Glover says the title came to him when he awoke from a dream two days after the famous fire over Lake Geneva. While he liked the title, he was reluctant to have the band use it because he initially thought it sounded like a drug song.[6] Glover also developed the guitar riff to “Maybe I’m a Leo”, stating, “I wrote the riff to ‘Maybe I’m a Leo’ after hearing John Lennon’s ‘How Do You Sleep?’.”

Glover departed the band, along with Gillan, after Deep Purple’s second tour of Japan in the summer of 1973.

From 1979 to 1984 he was the bassist, lyricist and producer for Ritchie Blackmore’s band, Rainbow, working on four of the group’s studio albums.

When Deep Purple reformed in April 1984, Glover returned to his old band where he has remained for the last three decades.

With Gov’t Mule at the classic concert The Deepest End:

November 29: I want to hold your hand by The Beatles was released in 1963

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and recorded in October 1963, it was the first Beatles record to be made using four-track equipment.

With advance orders exceeding one million copies in the United Kingdom, “I Want to Hold Your Hand” would have gone straight to the top of the British record charts on its day of release (29 November 1963) had it not been blocked by the group’s first million seller “She Loves You”, their previous UK single, which was having a resurgence of popularity following intense media coverage of the group.


We wrote a lot of stuff together, one-on-one, eyeball to eyeball. Like in I Want To Hold Your Hand, I remember when we got the chord that made the song. We were in Jane Asher’s house, downstairs in the cellar playing on the piano at the same time. And we had, ‘Oh you-u-u… got that something…’ And Paul hits this chord and I turn to him and say, ‘That’s it!’ I said, ‘Do that again!’ In those days, we really used to absolutely write like that – both playing into each other’s nose.

John Lennon, 1980
All We Are Saying, David Sheff

“‘Eyeball to eyeball’ is a very good description of it. That’s exactly how it was. ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ was very co-written. It was our big number one; the one that would eventually break us in America.”


Paul McCartney to Barry Miles, 1994


Taking two weeks to dislodge its predecessor, “I Want to Hold Your Hand” stayed at number 1 for five weeks and remained in the UK top 50 for 21 weeks in total.

John Lennon: vocals, guitar
Paul McCartney: vocals, bass 
George Harrison: lead guitar
Ringo Starr: drums

It was also the group’s first American number 1 hit, entering the Billboard Hot 100 chart on 18 January 1964 at number 45 and starting the British invasion of the American music industry.