November 19: Bruce Springsteen live at Kemper Arena, Kansas City in 1984 (full concert audio)

The fall leg of 1984 featured a more intense Bruce than the summer 1984 shows. The darker songs, such as “Johnny Bye Bye” and “State Trooper,” were played more and more. …. This show features a gorgeous “Racing in the Street,” as well as an extended “Nebraska set.
–> The Boots

Many fans seems to agree on this being the best concert from the “Born In The U.S.A.” tour. Not my fav Springsteen tour, but this show is great!

Audience tape, probably the best of the tour. “Reason To Believe” has a intro with Bruce on the harmonica and Roy on the keyboards. “Johnny Bye-Bye” is introduced by Bruce as “Bye-Bye Johnny”, and includes a few lines of “Mystery Train” towards the end…  “Racing In The Street” includes the now usual intro and also a spoken part at the end. “Kansas City” is included in the “Detroit Medley”. Recent reports on this show indicate that the original tape (or a 1st generation copy of it) was used for a radio broadcast in it’s entirety and that this broadcast was the source for the generally circulating tapes including the Crystal Cat release “Kansas City Night” . Now the show is available directly from Rick B’s master recording. Edited directly from the unedited master, a lot less edited, cut and processed than the Crystal Cat release. ‘Thunder Road’ fades out on the Crystal Cat release, but it is complete on this one. (“Roses In The Kansas Rain”, Ev2).
-> Brucebase

bruce springsteen roses in the kansas rain back

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November 18: Graham Parker was born in 1950

Photo: Borntolisten.com @ Bergenfest, Norway

 

Graham Parker is an English singer-songwriter, who is best known as the lead singer of the popular British band Graham Parker & the Rumour.

Graham Parker & The Rumour-Hold Back The Night Live 1977:

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Classic documentary: Heartworn Highways – the best music documentary ever made!

heartworn-highways1

The best music documentary ever made: Heartworn Highways

For it is just that, the best documentary about music I have ever seen! It looks like a home movie, you feel like you get insight into a world long gone and you feel like looking into a world just for the invited.

It is up on YouTube , so catch it before it gets taken down (or better, buy yourself a copy so you can see it as often as you want).

Heartworn Highways is made by James Szalapski whose vision captured some of the founders of the Outlaw Country  and Singer/Songwriter movement in Texas and Tennessee in the last weeks of 1975 and the first weeks of 1976. The film was not released theatrically until 1981.

Highlights for me: The visit to Townes Van Zandt’s caravan and the Christmas party at Guy and Susanna Clark (especially Steve Earle singing Mercenary Song).

Heartworn Highways (full movie):

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November 17: The late great Gene Clarke was born in 1944

gene-clark

Harold Eugene “Gene” Clark (November 17, 1944 – May 24, 1991) was an American singer-songwriter, and one of the founding members of the folk-rock group The Byrds. He did write some of The Byrds’ best songs, among them: “Feel A Whole Lot Better”, “Here Without You” and “Set You Free This Time”.

Backstage Pass  1979 with Chris Hillmann and Roger McGuinn, taken from the album, McGuinn, Clark & Hillman:

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Great documentary: Tom Waits Tales from a Cracked Jukebox BBC 2017

 

BBC:
Tom Waits is one of the most original musicians of the last five decades. Renowned for his gravelly voice and dazzling mix of musical styles, he’s also one of modern music’s most enigmatic and influential artists.

His songs have been covered by Bruce Springsteen, Rod Stewart and Norah Jones, among many others. But Waits has always pursued his own creative vision, with little concern for musical fashion.

In a long career of restless reinvention, from the barfly poet of his early albums to the junkyard ringmaster of Swordfishtrombones, his songs chronicle lives from the margins of American society – drifters, dreamers, hobos and hoodlums – and his music draws on a rich mix of influences, including the blues, jazz, Weimar cabaret and film noir.

Using rare archive, audio recordings and interviews, this film is a bewitching after-hours trip through the surreal, moonlit world of Waits’ music – a portrait of a pioneering musician and his unique, alternative American songbook.

Credits:
Executive Producer Richard Bright
Director James Maycock
Production Manager Fiona Crawford
Production Coordinator Fiona Dorman
Editor Bradley Richards
Camera Operator Luke Finn

Interviewed Guest: Terry Gilliam, Lucinda Williams, Ian Rankin, Ed Harcourt, Ralph Carney, Bones Howe, Ute Lemper, Nitin Sawhney, Guy Garvey and Jim Sclavunos

– Hallgeir

November 16: The Louvin Brothers released Satan is Real in 1959

satan-is-real

The Louvin Brothers – Satan is Real

What is it about this album?
Why is it so important in the americana /country/gospel music canon?

Satan Is Real is a gospel album by American country music duo The Louvin Brothers.

Released November 16, 1959
Recorded August 8–10, 1958
Genre Country, Gospel
Length 31:54
Label Capitol
Producer Ken Nelson, John Johnson (Reissue)

The gospel/country duo Charlie and Ira Louvin was born and grew up in the Sand Mountain region of Alabama, they lived on a cotton farm south of the Appalachian Mountains, that’s where they developed their distinct harmony style in the deep Sacred Harp tradition of the Baptist church.

Ira Louvin died in a car wreck in 1965. Charlie Louvin died two years ago at 83 just a few months after publishing his story about The Louvin brothers.

In The recently published book, Satan is Real, the ballad of the Louvin Brothers, Charlie talks about their singing style.This is not a straight quote, but it goes something  like this:

…people who saw the Louvin Brothers perform were mystified by the experience. Ira was a full head taller than me, he played the mandolin like Bill Monroe and sang in an impossibly high, tense, quivering tenor. I(Charlie) strummed a guitar, grinned like a vaudevillian and handled the bottom register. But every so often, in the middle of a song, some hidden signal flashed and we switched places — with Ira swooping down from the heights, and me angling upward — and even the most careful listeners would lose track of which man was carrying the lead. This was more than close-harmony singing; each instance was an act of transubstantiation.

I could not find any live footage from Satan is real, but this clip of them singing, I don’t belive you’ve met my baby is a fine showcase for their intricate singing style:

“It baffled a lot of people,” Charlie Louvin explains in his fantastic memoir. “We could change in the middle of a word. Part of the reason we could do that was that we’d learned to have a good ear for other people’s voices when we sang Sacred Harp. But the other part is that we were brothers.”

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