Bob Dylan the Weatherman – A playlist

You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows
– Bob Dylan (Subterranean Homesick Blues)

Wikipedia:
Weather is the state of the atmosphere, to the degree that it is hot or cold, wet or dry, calm or stormy, clear or cloudy.

Bob Dylan uses the weather both as a metaphor and in a literary sense, he is especially fond of rain and wind.

I’ve choses track that fits the lingo of a weatherman or that makes me think of the weather. Continue reading “Bob Dylan the Weatherman – A playlist”

Bob Dylan by the numbers – A playlist

Bob Dylan by the numbers – A playlist

“I said “Fee, fie, fo, fum, Cassius Clay, here I come
26, 27, 28, 29, I’m gonna make your face look just like mine
Five, four, three, two, one, Cassius Clay you’d better run
99, 100, 101, 102, your ma won’t even recognize you
14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, gonna knock him clean right out of his spleen”
– Bob Dylan, I shall be free No.10

A number is a mathematical object used to count, measure, and label. The original examples are the natural numbers 1, 2, 3, and so forth. A notational symbol that represents a number is called a numeral. In addition to their use in counting and measuring, numerals are often used for labels (as with telephone numbers), for ordering (as with serial numbers), and for codes (as with ISBNs). In common usage, the term number may refer to a symbol, a word, or a mathematical abstraction.
– Wikipedia Continue reading “Bob Dylan by the numbers – A playlist”

Bob Dylan sings the Blues – A playlist

Bob Dylan sings the Blues – A Playlist

 

Blues is a genre and musical form that originated in African-American communities in the “Deep South” of the United States around the end of the 19th century. The genre is a fusion of traditional African music and European folk music, spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts and chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads. Continue reading “Bob Dylan sings the Blues – A playlist”

10 Best Rolling Stones Songs from 1963/64 (videos & spotify playlist)

Here is my top 10 list of songs from this early period.

  1. Route 66
  2. Not Fade Away
  3. Little Red Rooster
  4. Time is On My Side
  5. Carol
  6. I Just Want To Make Love To You
  7. It´s All Over Now
  8. Around and Around
  9. I Wanna Be Your Man
  10. Tell Me

1. Route 66 (Bobby Troup)


Route 66, written by the late Bobby Troup, gets the album [their first album] off to a rousing start, Keith Richards playing an excellent guitar with a tight clap-back track rhythm by Bill Wyman & Charlie Watts. It soon became a popular stage number.
-Martin Elliott (The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962–2012)


Recorded January 3, 1964 @ Regent Sound Studio, London, England.
Continue reading “10 Best Rolling Stones Songs from 1963/64 (videos & spotify playlist)”

June 5: Van Morrison released “Days Like This” in 1995

“Days Like This” was a delight, Van´s best album in years. Perhaps reflecting his romantic hook-up with Irish beauty-queen Michelle Rocca (his companion walking the dogs in the cover photo). Van sounded happier here than he´d been for decade..
-Andy Gill (The Ultimate Music Guide – Van Morrison)

Continue reading “June 5: Van Morrison released “Days Like This” in 1995″

June 4: Bruce Springsteen released “Born in the U.S.A.” in 1984

Bruce Springsteen 1984

Imperceptible though the movement has been to many sensitive young people, Springsteen has evolved. In fact, this apparent retrenchment is his most rhythmically propulsive, vocally incisive, lyrically balanced, and commercially undeniable album. Even his compulsive studio habits work for him: the aural vibrancy of the thing reminds me like nothing in years that what teenagers loved about rock and roll wasn’t that it was catchy or even vibrant but that it just plain sounded good.
-Robert Christgau (robertchristgau.com)

But more than anything else, Born in the U.S.A. marked the first time that Springsteen’s characters really seemed to relish the fight and to have something to fight for. They were not defeated (“No Surrender”), and they had friendship (“Bobby Jean”) and family (“My Hometown”) to defend. The restless hero of “Dancing in the Dark” even pledged himself in the face of futility, and for Springsteen, that was a step. The “romantic young boys” of his first two albums, chastened by “the working life” encountered on his third, fourth, and fifth albums and having faced the despair of his sixth, were still alive on this, his seventh, with their sense of humor and their determination intact. Born in the U.S.A.was their apotheosis, the place where they renewed their commitment and where Springsteen remembered that he was a rock & roll star, which is how a vastly increased public was happy to treat him.
-William Ruhlmann (allmusic.com)

Born down in a dead mans town
The first kick I took was when I hit the ground
End up like a dog that’s been beat too much
Till you spend half your life just covering up

Born in the U.S.A., I was born in the U.S.A.
I was born in the U.S.A., born in the U.S.A.

Born in the USA – Live 1985:

Continue reading “June 4: Bruce Springsteen released “Born in the U.S.A.” in 1984″